Kawasaki 1-2 In Losail Opening Race

KRT riders Jonathan Rea and Tom Sykes finished first and second in the opening race under the floodlights at Losail, with Rea equalling the existing record of 17 wins in a single season with his 11th consecutive victory. Sykes also extended his own all-time WorldSBK Superpole winning total to 48 today, in his final WorldSBK […]

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KRT riders Jonathan Rea and Tom Sykes finished first and second in the opening race under the floodlights at Losail, with Rea equalling the existing record of 17 wins in a single season with his 11th consecutive victory. Sykes also extended his own all-time WorldSBK Superpole winning total to 48 today, in his final WorldSBK weekend with KRT.

With Sykes on pole and Rea alongside him the start of the race Rea took the holeshot into turn one and from then on ran at his own pace to ensure his latest win in what has been a remarkable fourth straight championship season.

Despite using up some of his front tyre life in his push to the front today Rea was able to keep his pace and composure to the end to record his 56th race victory for Kawasaki – a record for a single rider with a single manufacturer in WorldSBK. Eleven race wins in succession also moved Rea’s recent record of ten consecutive races on by one.

Sykes was on strong form from the start at Losail this weekend and extended his career Superpole record with a 1’56.124 lap in SP2 that just edged our Rea by 0.131 seconds.

In the race Tom was able to keep a clear space back to two battling riders and he finished just 1.424 seconds from Rea. Sykes was over 1.2 seconds from eventual third placed rider Alex Lowes, as he managed his pace to ensure he would finish second for a Kawasaki 1-2.

Race two will take place on Saturday the 29th of October 2018, again under the floodlights at 19.00 local time.

Toprak Razgatlioglu (Kawasaki Puccetti Racing) proved to be the top independent rider in race one, finishing tenth, while Leandro Mercado (Orelac Racing VerdNatura Kawasaki) was 12th. Roman Ramos (Team GoEleven Kawasaki) placed 14th for two championship points, while rookie rider Gabriele Ruiu (Team Pedercini Racing Kawasaki) scored a point for 15th.

Jonathan Rea, stated: “There is a lot of hard work done to arrive in this position. It is really difficult; to build the package, the team atmosphere and a feeling with the bike. This weekend I have not quite felt myself on the bike and I said to my guys yesterday evening that this game is so much about confidence. We have been lucky this year in that I have had such a great feeling with the bike and that we have had that little bit extra. That gives you confidence and you are able to ride in a certain way. That is how it is done; that confidence the bike gives me, working with the team. Every time we are struggling, or my confidence is down, my crew chief Pere Riba finds a way to re-invent that, and turn things around. I am really grateful for that. People can find a good team and a good bike, and a good team can find a good rider, but trying to put all the elements together is really difficult. But I certainly have that with the Kawasaki Racing Team.”

Tom Sykes, stated: “I think overall we made a good race. Yesterday in the long run there was myself and another rider who destroyed the front tyre, so today I think it all went to plan. This morning in FP4 we used a set of tyres from yesterday, the pace was there, improving all the time. Then the qualifying tyre went into the bike for Superpole and instantly when that tyre goes in I go to my more natural riding style, and everything becomes easier. That was nice to win Superpole. In the first, probably eight, laps I felt like we could have pushed on a little bit harder in some of the fast right corners but I just kind of knocked it back a fraction – which I think proved a good idea. I saw the gap closing behind me a fraction at one stage so I pushed to finish second.”

2018 KRT Rider Statistics
Jonathan Rea: World Champion 2015, 2016, 2017 & 2018
2018: Races 25, Wins 17, Podiums 22, Superpoles 2
Career Race Wins: 71 (56 for Kawasaki)
Career Podiums: 134 (92 for Kawasaki)
Career Poles: 16 (12 for Kawasaki)

Tom Sykes: World Champion 2013
2018: Races: 25, Wins 1, Podiums 8, Superpoles 6
Career Race Wins: 34 (34 for Kawasaki)
Career Podiums: 108 (107 for Kawasaki)
Career Poles: 48 (48 for Kawasaki)

6 x Riders’ Championships (Scott Russell 1993, Sykes 2013, Rea 2015, 2016, 2017 & 2018), 1 x EVO Riders’ Championship (David Salom 2014)
4 x Manufacturers’ Championships (Ninja ZX-10R 2015 & 2016, Ninja ZX-10RR 2017 & 2018)
4 x Teams’ Championships (KRT/Provec Racing 2015, 2016, 2017 & 2018)

Kawasaki FIM Superbike World Championship Statistics
Total Kawasaki Race Wins: 127 – second overall
Total Kawasaki Podiums: 380 – third overall
Total Kawasaki Poles: 81 – second overall

#NinjaSpirit

#RE4CH4MP

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SYM CityCom 300i – Freedom of the City #ScooterRevolution

Back in the ‘80’s South Africa went through a “petrol crisis”. I was working for a Honda dealership at the time and we would sell upwards of 50 bikes a month!. Bike salesman were order takers, and printed money as bikes flew of showroom floors. The challenge was to get enough stock to meet the […]

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Back in the ‘80’s South Africa went through a “petrol crisis”. I was working for a Honda dealership at the time and we would sell upwards of 50 bikes a month!. Bike salesman were order takers, and printed money as bikes flew of showroom floors. The challenge was to get enough stock to meet the demand. Motorcycles made huge sense as fuel efficient transport then, and they make even more sense now. So why are bike sales not off the charts? Our resident youngster, ZA Bikers photographer, Bjorn, has an interesting theory. Thinking about it, he may be on to something. Bjorn reckons that parents feel uneasy about their children’s safety on South Africa’s roads and don’t want them on bikes. I get it. When my kids were at school I too was not keen to have them on bikes. Transporting them here, there and everywhere was a mission, so what was the solution? A Yamaha B – Whizz scooter, that’s what. My daughter, the older of the two, scooted to school without any mishaps, as did my son when he inherited the little Yammie. Here’s the thing guys. Nothing has changed. Scooters just don’t have the “motorcycle” stigma. Once folks have got used to their kids scooting around, the transition to motorcycles is so much easier as we now have a safe track record and a traffic smart and aware kid.

Enter the “Scooter Revolution”. There is simply no better way to negotiate snarled up city streets than on a modern Scooter. This was brought home to me with a bang by a couple of weeks commuting on Sym’s brilliant CityCom 300i. I use motorcycles as my everyday transport, only resorting to driving a car if there is no way a bike can work. For example when you have to load a whole lot of stuff. The day that we collected the Sym from KMSA Distributors SA, the importers for these quality Taiwanese scooters, I was asked by a buddy to help him take his bike for service in Centurion. Gerry is a big guy, weighing in at around 100kg’s. I had my doubts about the ability of a 300cc scooter to haul 180kg’s at highway speeds, but was keen to give it a go. Fact is, we where blown away! Not only did the plucky scoot maintain highway speed with us both aboard, it did it in comfort!. In the weeks that followed I was impressed by not only what the scooter did, but how it did it. The Sym never feels laboured. It cruises at 120 on the highway at 6500 rpm, with another 2000 rpm to spare. Totally chilled. It is so willing that you find yourself backing off the throttle to reign it in as it runs to 130 plus.

Scooters carry their weight really low with both fuel and engine slung really low in the frame. This makes steering light and effortless. The 300i sports 16 inch wheels which add to the stability and excellent all round handling.

Suspension is conventional forks up front and twin shocks at the rear which are adjustable for preload. On their second preload setting they managed everything, including the two up duty admirably.

Typical of most scooters, the ride can be a little choppy over uneven surfaces, but that is being really critical. All in all the comfort is superb. Twin 260mm discs with twin puck callipers and braided hoses makes stopping from any speed a cinch.

The motor is a gem. A 278,3cc single, water cooled with a single overhead cam and a ceramic coated bore is peppy and super smooth, both in town and on the highway. It simply never feels strained or stressed with the CVT transmission seamlessly punting you along, easily outpacing the general traffic.

The practicality of a scooter is brilliant. I needed to pick up some bird seed. I normally buy in bulk and therefore have to use the car. No problem with the Sym. Two 10kg bags under the seat and a third hanging from the bag hook in front of my knees. There is a cubby with a power point for charging your phone or whatever. The under seat storage takes a full face helmet and rain suit quite comfortably.

An extended time with this Sym also showed it to be very fuel efficient. The ten litre fuel tank is good for 300k’s of typical Gauteng commuting. By that I mean a combination of highway and around town. I averaged 32,3k’s on a litre with typical riding.

Styling is modern and really handsome. Build quality is above reproach too. The windshield works really efficiently and the body provides proper wind protection. This 300 really hits the sweet spot in terms of overall balance. For me it is the perfect size. A tad smaller than a maxi scooter, but with adequate performance and real ease of use that makes it an ideal day to day ride.

At last the penny has dropped for me. I am going to do what half of Europe has already done. I am going to join the scooter revolution and get the freedom of the city! I’ll keep my bigger bikes for what they are built for and enjoy “scooting” around the city.

At R55 odd grand the 300i will make a perfect addition to my garage. Do yourself a favour, go ride one and discover for yourself how to slice and dice traffic like never before. Could just turn you into a revolutionary too.

For more information visit: www.sym.co.za/citycom300i

Review by: Dave Cilliers / photos by: Bjorn Moreira / www.zabikers.co.za

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Further innovations for KX250F in 2018

Kawasaki has just unveiled its eagerly awaited 2018 model year MX2 class racing machine with a host of changes for the coming season.. and it’s the most technically advanced yet. Revisions to the front fork components and settings are joined by adjustments at the rear for better all-round bump absorption and suspension action. And action […]

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Photo credit: Kawasaki Direct

Kawasaki has just unveiled its eagerly awaited 2018 model year MX2 class racing machine with a host of changes for the coming season.. and it’s the most technically advanced yet. Revisions to the front fork components and settings are joined by adjustments at the rear for better all-round bump absorption and suspension action.

Photo credit: Kawasaki Direct

And action is certainly at the top of the agenda in terms of engine updates. With reduced lap times as the ultimate goal – as well as more emphasis on holeshot acceleration out of the start gate – the new KX250F sees changes to the fuel injection function, the engineering of the inlet area and a new approach to the exhaust system.

Photo credit: Kawasaki Direct

Along with revised Fi settings, the fuel pump pressure is increased for the new season and the injector mounting angle is shallower. In terms of the inlet tract itself, this is reshaped and there is a shorter intake funnel. To complete the picture, the inlet timing is now slightly more advanced than previous models. This matched to a lower compression ratio at 13.4:1 and creates more power and torque over the current machine.

Photo credit: Kawasaki Direct

Contributing to the dual benefits of extra power and torque is a re-shaped exhaust that is both longer and wider as it exits the cylinder head and travels towards the silencer. The result? Better bottom end and mid-range, improved power feeling across the entire rev range and smoother power engagement effectively making the high RPM range even easier to use.

Photo credit: Kawasaki Direct

Focussing on the holeshot advantage, smooth, easy power and torque plus innovative upgrades, the new 2018 KX250F boldly starts as it means to go on, as quarter litre first choice in MX.

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Alex Rins Suzuki Ecstar MotoGP Wallpaper Online

Team Suzuki Press Office – October 21. To celebrate Alex Rins’ third MotoGP™ podium of the season at Motegi in Japan aboard the GSX-RR this weekend, Suzuki has produced a…

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Team Suzuki Press Office – October 21. To celebrate Alex Rins’ third MotoGP™ podium of the season at Motegi in Japan aboard the GSX-RR this weekend, Suzuki has produced a...

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Race Win For Waters At Philip Island ASBK

Team Suzuki Press Office – October 17. Josh Waters – GSX-R1000 – 1-7 Markus Chiodo – GSX-R1000 – DNF-DNF Team Suzuki ECSTAR Australia’s Josh Waters ended the 2018 Australian Superbike…

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Team Suzuki Press Office – October 17. Josh Waters – GSX-R1000 – 1-7 Markus Chiodo – GSX-R1000 – DNF-DNF Team Suzuki ECSTAR Australia’s Josh Waters ended the 2018 Australian Superbike...

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