Clément Desalle seventh in Italy

Clement Desalle of the Monster Energy Kawasaki Racing Team finished seventh in the GP of Lombardy, eleventh round of the FIM World MXGP Motocross Championship, at Ottobiano in northern Italy. Having won the last two GPs in France and Russia the Belgian arrived full of confidence at the sandy track on the northern basin of […]

Clement Desalle of the Monster Energy Kawasaki Racing Team finished seventh in the GP of Lombardy, eleventh round of the FIM World MXGP Motocross Championship, at Ottobiano in northern Italy.

Having won the last two GPs in France and Russia the Belgian arrived full of confidence at the sandy track on the northern basin of Italy, but he never quite achieved his expectations as temperatures soared about 40 degrees with high humidity. A crash during the qualification race on Saturday got the racing activity off to an unfortunate start although Clement recovered to twelfth place by the finish, a gate choice which enabled him to still make good starts in both GP motos. He started the first moto in fourth position but found it difficult to maintain his usual consistent rhythm and eventually finished eighth, frustratingly losing the final place on the very last lap. Again starting fourth in race two he again failed to find a good rhythm and eventually took the chequered flag in seventh position. Clement is now third in the series standings, just three points shy of second.

Teammate Jordi Tixier returned to action after sitting out the Russian GP two weeks previously and immediately showed good speed to qualify tenth and the Frenchman again impressed as he moved forward to finish eleventh after inevitably needing time to find his race rhythm during the early laps of the race. Race two followed a similar pattern as he advanced from twelfth to seventh during the middle of the race before being forced to retire after a big crash.

Tommy Searle of Monster Energy DRT Kawasaki attended the GP as a spectator; he injured his left hand when he struck a trackside post two weeks previously but expects to be given clearance to ride again next week and can hopefully return to GP action after the summer break.

Clément Desalle: “It was a tough weekend with such high temperatures. In the first race I had a good start but in the first few corners I lost several positions. I was fourth and tried to keep my rhythm but it was tough and I eventually finished eighth; I was disappointed to lose one position on the very last lap. I know how I train in the week and every time I try to analyse how it’s going, but the opponents are strong in the MXGP class. My second start was also good; I was fourth or fifth and again I tried to keep my rhythm to finish seventh. I can’t say that I’m happy with the results but I am glad to go back home in one piece as yesterday I had a big crash in the qualifying race. I learnt a few things this weekend that will help me to prepare even better for future hot events; it’s always important to learn from the experience of every situation.”

Jordi Tixier: “It was a positive comeback, even if the final result is not what I was expecting. On Saturday I qualified in tenth which was not so bad as I couldn’t train so much in the sand before coming here due to my injury. My first moto was also not so bad; I was just missing some speed and rhythm during the first part of the race. In the second race I had a better feeling and was able to improve my rhythm in the last fifteen minutes where I posted my best laps. I could pass some good riders to come back to seventh, but then I had a big crash and had to retire. I want to keep the positive points; I have a good speed when I ride smoothly, and we must continue to work like that. Everyone know that my body doesn’t like high temperatures, but since last year we find some solutions to improve the situation.”

Tommy Searle: “I had already booked my flight to come here before my latest injury so I thought I would come and see everyone in the team and support them. It’s two weeks now since I injured my hand and the doctor said that I should be back on the bike within four weeks without an operation. I go back for a check-up on Thursday and can expect to be back riding one week after that so hopefully I can return to racing at the Czech GP after the summer break.”

Morgan Lesiardo wins at home in Italy

Morgan Lesiardo clinched victory for the Monster Energy Kawasaki MX2 Racing Team in the FIM European EMX250 Championship round at Ottobiano in northern Italy to extend his series points lead. The Italian teenager was dominant in the Saturday afternoon race to claim victory in stifling heat as temperatures soared above 40 degrees and the intense […]

Morgan Lesiardo clinched victory for the Monster Energy Kawasaki MX2 Racing Team in the FIM European EMX250 Championship round at Ottobiano in northern Italy to extend his series points lead.

The Italian teenager was dominant in the Saturday afternoon race to claim victory in stifling heat as temperatures soared above 40 degrees and the intense humidity demanded high levels of fitness. After two weeks of solid testing with the team Morgan took the holeshot and controlled the pace from the front. An incident at the first turn of race two, run in cooler conditions after an early morning thunderstorm had cleared the air, left Morgan outside the top twenty but he showed his maturity to tenaciously fight his way back to second, sufficient to secure the overall victory. He now leads the series by nineteen points after six of nine rounds.

Tristan Charboneau and Marshal Weltin of Bud Racing Monster Energy Kawasaki raced to sixth and thirteenth positions respectively in the unusual sandy conditions on Saturday. Charboneau crashed whilst fourth on Sunday morning while Weltin finished tenth and is now eighth in the series standings.

Morgan Lesiardo: “I have been waiting for this race in Ottobiano. I love this place; it’s only one hour from home so I had many friends and fans who came to cheer me this weekend. I’m really happy to win my first race with the Kawasaki; it’s like a dream to win a race in Italy! I’m also happy for the team; they do a lot of work for me and I want to thank everyone for their support, including Christophe who worked with me the past two weeks in Belgium. For the first race the weather was really hot, like 46° but thankfully the track was not yet too bumpy; it was good to get the holeshot as I could ride my own rhythm all race. Today the track was rougher but the weather was cooler for us; my start was good again but in the first corner other riders pushed me and I nearly crashed and I was around twenty-fifth. I did a couple of fast laps to come back into the top five and at the finish I was second. After this win and the testing we did during the last two weeks in Belgium I feel much more confident, and now the goal is to win some more races and keep the red plate all season.”

In the heat of Ottobiano

The young Kawasaki MX2 GP riders suffered in the extreme heat of the GP of Lombardy at the sandy track of Ottobiano in the middle of the north Italian basin as temperatures soared above 40 degrees. Teenager Stephen Rubini was left alone to fly the colours of the Monster Energy Kawasaki MX2 Racing Team after […]

The young Kawasaki MX2 GP riders suffered in the extreme heat of the GP of Lombardy at the sandy track of Ottobiano in the middle of the north Italian basin as temperatures soared above 40 degrees.

Teenager Stephen Rubini was left alone to fly the colours of the Monster Energy Kawasaki MX2 Racing Team after the enforced withdrawal of Petar Petrov on practice day, and the French youngster strived hard to achieve results without the success he and the team had hoped for. In both motos he gated well and took up the chase within the points-scoring positions but crashes on the opening lap of each moto already hindered his progress. He was recovering well in the first moto and was on the edge of the top twenty when he crashed again at half distance and, with little chance of recovering the lost places again, he withdrew to save energy for race two as temperatures soared again after an early morning storm and humidity was claustrophobically high. Again starting well in race two Stephen was delayed when he became the sandwich between a crashed rider and another rival who hit him from behind. He again pushed hard and quickly reached twenty-second place, just two away from the points, when he stalled the engine and was inevitably affected by the heat as the stop broke his rhythm. He continued to the chequered flag and missed world championship points by one position.

Teammate Petar Petrov, who had dislocated a shoulder two weeks previously in Russia, bravely tried to ride, but the shoulder popped out again without him even crashing and the Bulgarian will now undergo surgery and miss the remainder of the series.

Darian Sanayei of Monster Energy DRT Kawasaki qualified thirteenth on Saturday and had high hopes of a significant score, but the American’s luck ran out on race day. Twenty-fourth on lap one of the opening moto after getting tangled up soon after the start he quickly advanced to nineteenth after just three laps before crashing and damaging the bike. Again finding life difficult at the awkward 180 degree first turn he started race two twenty-first, but was making great strides and was running fourteenth three laps from the close when he crashed hard and required medical treatment; the doctors confirmed that he has no broken bones but have advised some days of recuperation so he could miss next weekend’s Portuguese GP.

Stephen Rubini: “It was a tough weekend, as I crashed early in both races. I was twice in the top fifteen which was not so bad, but I crashed on the first lap each time. In the first race I came back on the track with a good rhythm but it was not enough to be in the points and after another crash I retired. In the second moto I couldn’t avoid a pile up as another rider was down on the track in front of me and someone behind me pushed me so we were several riders on the ground together. But I didn’t give up; when I stalled the engine later in the race it was really tough with the heat but I didn’t want to retire and I finished the race twenty-first. That’s not the results I was expecting but we’ll continue to work.”

Petar Petrov: “The whole season has been hard for me, but what can we do when you’re so unlucky? I give my best every time I came, even if I was in pain but sometimes it’s not possible and you have to accept the situation. I rode the bike during the week and felt good, but with the heat here the muscles relax quite a lot and in the first practice session the shoulder I dislocated in Russia came out again. Now I will have surgery; for sure the season is over and the goal will be to get healthy again and ready for 2018.”

Jonathan Rea MBE

As a KRT WorldSBK rider with two world championships in his locker Jonathan Rea is well used to earning plaudits for his on-track exploits. As well as these sporting rewards he has now also been given an important honorary award – an MBE. In recognition of his sporting achievements Rea was recently awarded an MBE […]

As a KRT WorldSBK rider with two world championships in his locker Jonathan Rea is well used to earning plaudits for his on-track exploits. As well as these sporting rewards he has now also been given an important honorary award – an MBE.

In recognition of his sporting achievements Rea was recently awarded an MBE (Member of the British Empire medal) in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list.

There are a few different types of honours that the British Crown gives out, twice per year, to worthy recipients who have performed some kind of service, or an achievement that benefits the nation or its international standing. Jonathan has now been officially recognised in the UK as worthy of such recognition.

Rea explained the process of how it came about. “I received a letter a couple of months ago to accept that my name had been put forward for the MBE and I ticked the box that says, “Yes I do” and sent it back!”

Receiving this kind of recognition is a real honour in the UK, and not just for Rea himself. “I think the most important thing is that I got more messages on my phone about the MBE than I did when I won the championship,” said Jonathan. “It seems like a bigger accolade to have, for the general public. It means that you are recognised in open society, not just as a niche sport. That means a lot. It is nice to get motorcycling recognised in the mainstream. Maybe the young Princes had something to do with it, selling motorsport to the Queen?”

Rea joins some other illustrious British bike racers in receiving an official honour, as Rea is well aware. “Also, heroes like Joey Dunlop have achieved not just an MBE but and OBE (Order of the British Empire) as well, so to join him as a Member of the British Empire is really cool,” said Jonathan. “Also Foggy (Carl Fogarty), the most dominant Superbike rider of all time. So I am putting my name along with good people.”

His KRT team-manager, Guim Roda, said of Jonathan’s award, “We saw in the media during race weekend at Misano that Jonathan had received this award. Within the team, which is based in Spain, we didn’t know the real status of it until his assistant, Kev, explained the full meaning. We are so happy for Johnny and we can assure Her Majesty that she will give the medal not only to a great sportsman but also to an incredible person – a kind and very committed one. We all must be happy for Johnny and I’m sure he will represent this honour well.”

Toprak Sixth At Misano As Deroue Still Leads WorldSSP300

STK1000 rider Toprak Razgatlioglu (Kawasaki Puccetti Racing) was sixth at the Misano round on his Ninja ZX-10RR, after a stopped and restarted race that was finally held over just five laps. The planned 15-lap race was halted when a rival’s machine experienced a technical problem and oil on the track brought out the red flags. […]

STK1000 rider Toprak Razgatlioglu (Kawasaki Puccetti Racing) was sixth at the Misano round on his Ninja ZX-10RR, after a stopped and restarted race that was finally held over just five laps.

The planned 15-lap race was halted when a rival’s machine experienced a technical problem and oil on the track brought out the red flags. Toprak was in a podium position for a time in both legs of a STK1000 contest, of which only the five lap second race counted for points. After a tough fight in the second race he was finally ranked sixth on the day.

Attempting to get back into contention with the top three after being overtaken by two riders in quick succession, an attempted pass inside his rivals into the Quercia left hand corner almost paid off for Toprak. After drifting wide on the exit he dropped to seventh, however.

Only a last corner move ensured that Toprak would re-pass his fellow Kawasaki rider Jeremy Guarnoni (Pedercini Racing Kawasaki) for sixth place, with Guarnoni right behind in seventh.

Ilya Mykhalchyk (Triple M Racing Kawasaki) went ninth in the short five-lap race, with Glenn Scott (Agro On-Benjan Kawasaki) scoring a point for 15th.

Razgatlioglu now sits second in the championship rankings, by one point, with Michael Ruben Rinaldi on 90 and Toprak on 89. Guarnoni is seventh overall with 38 points.

Toprak Razgatlioglu, stated, “We haven’t fought for the win in Italy, at Misano, so I finished sixth in a very short race. When the championship restarts after the summer break hopefully I will fight for the championship in the other races. Many thanks to everyone for their support once again.”

Scott Deroue (MTM HS Kawasaki) still leads the WorldSSP300 championship, which is all-new for the 2017 season. Scott was the fastest Kawasaki rider at a warm and sunny Misano, in a 13-lap race that went full distance.

Deroue’s championship lead, which he has held since the start of the season after winning the first two rounds, is now three points, over Mika Perez.

Female rider Ana Carrasco (ETG Racing Kawasaki) was 14th and scored two points at Misano, which puts her into tenth place in the championship after the first five rounds.

For both WorldSSP300 and STK1000 categories the next meeting will be held after the long summer break, at Lausitzring in Germany on Sunday 20th August.

Scott Deroue, stated: “Again it was a really difficult race. Outside of the Imola round I have always been the best-classified rider on a Kawasaki. Now that brings me a twelfth position and it isn’t a good result for me. It’s hard to see, as I’m giving my best. Now Perez is my biggest threat, after his victory at Misano. I’m now going to prepare myself in the best possible way for the last four rounds, to keep the leading position in this championship during the second half of the season.”