Suzuki Ecstar SV650A ‘Road – Trip’ – Part 3 Video

The final part of the Team SUZUKI ECSTAR MotoGP™ road-trip from the Red Bull Ring MotoGP™ race in Spielberg, Austria to the Brno circuit in the Czech Republic is now online on Team Suzuki Racing.

Team Suzuki Press Office – December 20.

 

The final part of the Team SUZUKI ECSTAR MotoGP™ road-trip from the Red Bull Ring MotoGP™ race in Spielberg, Austria to the Brno circuit in the Czech Republic is now online on Team Suzuki Racing.

 

 

The video features Team Press Officer Federico Tondelli, Data Engineer Elvio Deganello and Mechanic Jacques Roca on a fun adventure and bike test of Suzuki’s SV650A machines, taking-in some stunning scenery along the way.

 

To watch Part 3 on Team Suzuki Racing: CLICK HERE

Federico Tondelli Blog

Team SUZUKI ECSTAR Press Officer Federico Tondelli gives an insight into the work involved behind the scenes, along with the highs, lows and special moments of the 2016 MotoGP™ season.

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Team Suzuki Press Office – December 19.

 

Team SUZUKI ECSTAR Press Officer Federico Tondelli gives an insight into the work involved behind the scenes, along with the highs, lows and special moments of the 2016 MotoGP™ season.

 

 

“As the Team’s Press Officer, basically I am responsible for two main tasks; to manage the riders’ (and other team members’) agenda for what concerns the media and marketing activities – and to also provide content to media and fans. The difficulty of the first task depends much on the rider performances: the media’s attention follows a priority order which is directly linked to the race classification, as the better you perform, the more they ask you for. This also influences the second task: Our priority is to give the most visibility to our Team and it is much easier when you win. But quantity is not the only driving factor; as a Factory – and relatively new team in MotoGP™ – we strongly believe in giving quality to our content to be sure that the media get the right message and the fans feel involved in our project.
 

“Fans are very important to us because we know that there is a lot of affection to the Suzuki brand, also a real personal emotional engagement with the brand, and we really try to pay attention and care to this aspect. Of course, we have another target in our communication activities, which is to give the best support to our Suzuki network in the marketing activities, as well as to give our partners the support they deserve as part of our MotoGP project.

 

 

“Concerning my job, things have changed a lot since the first year. Not only has my experience increased, but also the kind of work requested for the Team’s awareness and strong change of strategies. If last year Team SUZUKI ECSTAR was the Cinderella of MotoGP, right after the 2016 winter tests it was clear that our role in the paddock would have changed. Especially with the increased-performance of the GSX-RR and the growing talents of our riders Aleix Espargaró and Maverick Viñales, the attention of the media came right away.
 

“If in 2015 the main job was to push the visibility of Team SUZUKI ECSTAR across media, in 2016 we had to change the role and dedicated ourselves to create more quality than quantity in our content. Then, Maverick’s first podium at Le Mans – and the first Victory at Silverstone – finally set us as top contenders in every race; meaning a strong change of perception of our Team in the global media’s opinion. This meant also a big increase in the requests for interviews, thus making the riders and Davide Brivio’s agenda more complicated to manage. The main task was still to provide the deserved attention and space to all media, but also to keep the average quality of the content at the top.”
 

What is your own ‘High’ of the season – and why? “It’s easy to say, in only three words: ‘Winning is Addictive!’ When I started the MotoGP project in 2015 I was used to competition, even the strongest one, but haven’t lived a real victory before. I didn’t even know what to expect in case of a victory, I tried to learn from my team-mates, and especially from my Team Manager Davide Brivio, who were all a lot more ‘experienced’ than me in terms of podiums, but honestly, it’s not even comparable to the emotion of the victory when you live it. You will see long-experienced people cry and hear their broken voice, you’ll see a young man on the top of the podium with a light in his eyes that is not comparable with any other brightness, you will see strong men jump and laugh and hug just like they were kids on Christmas morning. For me, as a Press Officer, the work starts when the race ends: Interviews with TV, press conferences, press releases, pictures… I’d say I couldn’t have time to realise what was happening for real. And then it comes the Monday after, when I got back home and got the press review of International media coverage, when I got calls from everywhere in the world to ask for interviews or even to simply give me congratulations to report to the Team, is when I realised that that was for real; that Maverick got the Suzuki on the top of the MotoGP podium. Team Suzuki in these two years has become a real family, we all feel as a family. Also with the people at the Suzuki Factory in Japan, and all our network, it was living a victory in a Family as it is a victory of all the people with whom you speak with every day, with whom you share 18 races in a year and spend days, weeks, months all around the world. And then the first victory changes your perspective, it gives you a new hunger. A kind of hunger you don’t know until you taste it for the first time. If last year a sixth place was a success, after the first victory you really feel you can do it and you can’t wait to live again that adrenaline, that emotion, that excitement. You can’t wait to be able to climb the pit wall again at the chequered flag and scream happiness to the rider while he crosses the line.”

 

 

You’ve worked with both riders. How was Maverick to work with? How was Aleix to work with? “I can’t say if one is better of the other, because both Aleix and Maverick are excellent people and to me it would be like to choose the best of my two ‘sons’ if I had to pick my favourite. For sure they are very different; and, they have changed a lot in these two years. Unfortunately, Aleix went through a difficult season in 2016, as he struggled to find effectiveness with the machine and incurred some crashes. Despite this hard situation, he proved to be a solid and reliable rider, deserving his role of factory rider. He kept on, never gave up; and helped the engineers to develop the machine. To me he was a perfect example of reliability, consistency and strength. Maverick impressed me – and many others in the team – when he arrived in Sepang for the first test of 2016. It was clear that he was not the rookie any longer and he introduced himself as strongly motivated and fit. He was in perfect shape, but also his mentality increased a huge amount during winter. It was already clear that with a competitive bike he would achieve the desired results in the season. This was impressive to me; at only 21 years old he was already a grown-up rider and man. This had implications also in his work with media as his attitude became stronger, wiser and he was more focused.”

 

 

What is your best moment – or most emotional – this year at Team SUZUKI ECSTAR? “More than the funniest thing, I will always remember one of the most emotional things we did as a team. When the riders came in to the pit after the last race in Valencia, they found the whole team waiting for them outside the garage, in the pit lane. It wasn’t planned, the idea came right in that moment to our Team Co-ordinator Roberto Brivio and simply we all felt we wanted to get outside and welcome them like a big hug. We went out and created a corridor into two wings of people where they arrived with the machines and we all shared the sadness of the goodbye, but also the satisfaction with the successes achieved in the season. This is what makes us a real family; the best moments come without any planning, we just felt we were acting as if were one.”
 

What’s your saddest moment or memory of 2016 – and why? “Needless to say, the saddest moment was when we knew about Maverick’s decision to leave Team SUZUKI ECSTAR in 2017. Not only because we had big expectations of him with Suzuki, but also because that meant finishing an era and that we had to rebuild a team, changing both riders. Of course, we are all happy for the new riders, Iannone and Rins, but it took me some time to set myself and reorganise the program and the planning.”

Suzuki Ecstar SV650A “Road – Trip’ – Part 2 Video

Part 2 of the Team SUZUKI ECSTAR MotoGP™ road-trip from the Red Bull Ring MotoGP™ race in Spielberg, Austria to the Brno circuit in the Czech Republic riding three of Suzuki’s SV650A machines is now online.

suzuki-ecstar-sv650a-roadtrip--part-2-video

 

Team Suzuki Press Office – December 13.

 

Part 2 of the Team SUZUKI ECSTAR MotoGP™ road-trip from the Red Bull Ring MotoGP™ race in Spielberg, Austria to the Brno circuit in the Czech Republic riding three of Suzuki’s SV650A machines is now online.

The video features Team Press Officer Federico Tondelli, Data Engineer Elvio Deganello and Mechanic Jacques Roca on a fun adventure and bike test of Suzuki’s SV650A with some stunning scenery along the way.

To watch Part 2 on Team Suzuki Racing: CLICK HERE

 

 

Tom Sykes: still busting moves on the bike

World Superbike will be the first FIM World Championship to lay rubber on asphalt as the calendar flicks pages onto 2017, and the opening round at Phillip Island in Australia on February 25th-26th will stride up quickly for the globe’s quickest production bike racing athletes. 2016 runner-up and former title holder Tom Sykes will use […]

World Superbike will be the first FIM World Championship to lay rubber on asphalt as the calendar flicks pages onto 2017, and the opening round at Phillip Island in Australia on February 25th-26th will stride up quickly for the globe’s quickest production bike racing athletes. 2016 runner-up and former title holder Tom Sykes will use the period of weeks and days before the trip to the southern hemisphere as prime time for rest, recuperation, race reflection and training for another twenty-six sprint series.

The Englishman was one of three riders from the United Kingdom to lay siege to the WorldSBK results books in 2016 (20 podiums from 26, including 5 wins and 8 Pole Positions), even if his physical and bustling style on the Kawasaki Racing Team ZX-10R was not enough to eventually dethrone teammate Jonathan Rea.

Straight-shooting Sykes has been at the pinnacle of the championship for half a decade and after completing chilly winter tests at the Jerez circuit in Spain was in a relaxed mood to talk off-season prep as road racing heads into hibernation and his victorious team finally downs tools after another remarkable campaign.

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Tom, what happens now? A break and then a strict winter programme?

The season finishes, we get into testing and then I’ll have a steady couple of weeks where I won’t do much! I’ll still be active but not at a great level, just [exercise] to tick over. Most of my training revolves around running and cycling. I don’t do any flat track or motocross like many of the others. My hobbies are karting…which is pretty much it!

Any reason for not using other forms of motorcycle riding?

Yes and no…you see many riders having problems with injury. I stick to karting because you have a lot more margin for error. I don’t have such a big desire to ride other bikes. I used to do trials and motocross and I still love those sports…but I don’t really get around to doing it anymore.

Running and cycling is quite cardio heavy: do you have a detailed plan for getting and keeping fit?

Not something that is over-stressed. I know what I have to do. I cycle more when my mate back home is around because he tends to put me in the weeds! He’s a strong guy. A lot of my stuff is about base conditioning and as long as I feel that I can get off the bike after Race2 on a Sunday and still feel like I could do a couple more races then that’s enough. With testing then you’ll be in leathers all day and doing 70-80 laps, which is four races and we’ll do that day after day for five days. Your muscles get sore but you learn and adapt to work through that.

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Does fitness ever lead to confidence for you? Especially when things might not be going so well…

Personally speaking I would say my fitness, resting heart rate and so on, is at a good level. If I am being honest I probably don’t have the ‘gym body’ of some guys…but on the bike I know I have the batteries and power to go the distance, so it isn’t a big issue for me. I can see how for some riders ‘image’ is a bit more psychological but for me as long as I know I have the engine and performance inside then any kind of cosmetics is not essential.

Where are you normally based through an off-season?

In the UK, just outside of Leamington Spa; I love the place, really nice. My wife is from that area and for doing what I do – airports and motorway links – it works. OK, I pay my extra tax but it’s worth it for me because it’s all about the convenience; of being near family, friends. It is priceless to be able to jump in the car and go and see my family whenever I want. It doesn’t matter what people say about it [the UK] there are some really beautiful areas…plus I get to travel the world and see a lot of it anyway.

“We do an adrenaline sport and you are spending a long time with a high heart rate and you are physically ‘switched on’ with every single muscle. You are dancing on the bike.”

You mentioned cycling. Is that mountain bike or road?

Well, again, maybe I’m a bit of a pussy if I’m honest! Or maybe better to say I’m a bit smart. I’m very lucky with what I do [his job] and I love mountain biking but silly little things can happen. I remember going out once with a group of mates and had a small crash by not getting my foot out of the clip-on in time and twisted my ankle. It could have been a knee and if you are not careful you are out for a few weeks. It’s not worth it. I love mountain biking and it is really great to be out with mates….but I’m used to making sacrifices and because of what I do I’m used to compromises.

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Not wish to label you old at 31 but as the seasons roll on and the long haul travel continue and racing happens in hot conditions like Thailand, USA and Malaysia does it become more important to, say, resist that extra slice of pizza?

I’ll pretty much eat what I want and I might not be the prettiest to look at but because I have put the miles and hours in with regards to that kind of training I know I have the engine when called upon. I enjoy desserts but I don’t have a sweet tooth. I can eat a lot and my diet is general good. Like with anything moderation is good.

Do you think you have to be a finely tuned athlete to achieve at this level?

I think you have to be fit and I would say that all motorcycle racers – and especially the top ones – they would surprise a lot of people if you would compare them against ‘professional athletes’ so to speak. We do an adrenaline sport and you are spending a long time with a high heart rate and you are physically ‘switched on’ with every single muscle. You are dancing on the bike. You have to manhandle it left and right because really it just wants to go straight. I think the majority of riders are at a great level. You see some people and you think ‘they look good’ in terms of lean body fat…but that doesn’t necessarily mean they have the ‘engine’. It all depends what is underneath. It is like the bike: I’d rather it didn’t look exciting because as long as the engine and the chassis are good then this is the main issue. Your priority has to be your heart, lungs and mind. Then things like flexibility come after.

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What about the mental side? Have you explored that aspect to unearth a few extra tenths?

I looked at it a few years ago but I would say that mentally I’m at a good level. I think it comes from being down-to-earth and appreciating simple values of life…as well as really understanding what is needed on the track. That is the key to success and the development of the Kawasaki ZX-10R. I have understood what is needed to go faster…and I’ve had difficult years; seasons when I’ve had strong teammates and situations where I feel I wasn’t necessarily given an equal chance. I knew I could be further up the field but I wasn’t for a number of reasons. So I had to learn how to deal with that and react. It’s the same now. There is a bike I have developed and Jonathan is riding it but it is a long way from a bike that I would consider having a racing pedigree. I have to learn a lot because it is quite far from what we had in the past. It has really suited Jonathan’s style and he is riding it well. He has beaten me for two years running but I can go to bed at night, put my head on the pillow and sleep knowing that I have been beaten fair. A lot of riders will make excuses and they are just trying to make themselves feel better. Yes, we can probably improve in ‘this’ and ‘that’ area but I can accept the situation. I know I need to change my style because at the moment the character of the ‘beast’ so to speak doesn’t compliment my style and we are not in harmony. If my mind wasn’t strong then I could have been completely destroyed in the last two years but I think we are doing alright.

It doesn’t help to get hysterical…

Correct. Keep level-headed and in racing if you don’t win then you have to try and understand why. You are always chasing perfection and unfortunately it sometimes rubs-off on your personal life but you have to understand that and react. You have to try and keep strong, that’s for sure.

Suzuki SV650A ‘Road – Trip’ – Part 1 Video

The opening instalment of Team SUZUKI ECSTAR’s road-trip from the Red Bull Ring MotoGP™ race in Spielberg, Austria to the Brno circuit in the Czech Republic riding three of Suzuki’s SV650A machines is now online at Team Suzuki Racing.

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Team Suzuki Press Office – December 6

 

The opening instalment of Team SUZUKI ECSTAR’s road-trip from the Red Bull Ring MotoGP™ race in Spielberg, Austria to the Brno circuit in the Czech Republic riding three of Suzuki’s SV650A machines is now online at Team Suzuki Racing.
 

Three Team members and friends, Press Officer Federico Tondelli, Data Engineer Elvio Deganello and Team Mechanic Jacques Roca put the popular Adventure Touring machines to the test in a fun journey through some beautiful scenery.



Click here to watch video